5 Reasons to Be a Flash Fiction Junkie

author rb frankGuest Post
by R.B. Frank

I’m addicted to flash fiction. I like reading it; I like writing it. Writing flash fiction is a quick hit and an adrenaline rush for those who crave immediate satisfaction. I can jump from website to contest to blog. I can submit and move on at lightning speed. And if that’s the case, then do I have another issue? Could you say I have FF-Induced ADD? When I read Top-Reasons-Why-yada-yada-yada, if there are more than five I zone out. Forget about 100 Places to Visit Before You Die. I’m dead before I finish the list. So for those of you who stare at the kettle willing it to boil, your wait time is over. Here are 5 great reasons to spend available nano-time writing nano-fiction. Continue reading “5 Reasons to Be a Flash Fiction Junkie”

TaleHunt: Flash Fiction on the Go

talehuntlogoIf you’re looking to get a little writing practice in while on the go, but tweets are too short for you, maybe TaleHunt will fit the bill.

TaleHunt is a smartphone app available for Apple and Android devices. (The developers are working on a version for Windows phones.) It’s free to download and install. I didn’t see any ads or in-app purchase options – although I presume one or the other, or both, will be coming eventually.

The app allows you to write and post 250-character stories – not words, characters – which other users can then read and vote on. The developers are billing it as the first dedicated flash fiction app. It debuted in January and has about 10,000 users right now. Continue reading “TaleHunt: Flash Fiction on the Go”

Five Flash Fiction Elements

flash fiction lightningAs I hope you all know, here at Indies Unlimited, we have a weekly flash fiction contest. The prompt goes up on Saturday, and the submission period closes on Tuesday. The word limit for our contest is 250 words. But there’s more to flash fiction than just our challenge.

As a general rule, flash fiction is considered to be less than 1,000 words long. And believe it or not, you can study how to write it. I did a web search for “how to write a flash fiction story” and got five million hits, including some for courses that would take way longer to complete than would simply writing a bunch of flash pieces until you get the hang of it.

Flash is a recognized format for fiction, with elements that each story ought to include. As usual with these sorts of things, the list of elements varies, depending on who’s writing it. I’ve seen lists of three, four, five, seven, or ten elements, or do’s and don’ts, or what-have-you. I like the number five, so for this article I’m going to stick with five things your flash fiction story should include. Continue reading “Five Flash Fiction Elements”

Use Short Fiction to Help Your Novel Writing

Typewriter - Once upon a timeI don’t know about other novel writers, but something happens to my brain between drafts. It’s tired, but it’s too revved up to stop. The state reminds me of my brief long-distance running career. After a major race, lying around “resting” was anything but restful. My body preferred short jogs for a few days, to recover and refresh for the next goal. So when I was going a little stir-crazy waiting to begin the second draft of one of my novels, a friend suggested I try writing a few short stories to keep myself out of trouble. I’ve always found the form intimidating—novel writing gives me the luxury to delve deep into characters and story, and many of my attempts earned me the same response from critique groups: “That sounds like the beginning of a novel.” Sigh. Also, when the subject comes up among writers, you always hear examples of such-and-such author who is better at one length than another. Continue reading “Use Short Fiction to Help Your Novel Writing”