Which “Curves” Flash Fiction Story Gets Your Vote?

Vote5It’s that time again…time to choose your favorite flash fiction story of the week! It’s all up to you now – only one can win Flash Fiction Readers’ Choice Champion honors. It’s super easy – choose your favorite and cast your vote below.

Check out this week’s entries here. Make your decision, then come back to THIS page and click the gray circle next to the person’s name. Scroll down to the vote button which will turn blue, and then click it. Please then use those share buttons at the bottom of the post to spread the word. Attention Authors: It is okay if you ask people to vote for you!

Voting polls close Thursday at 5 PM Pacific time. If the poll doesn’t close on time, any votes received after 5 pm will be removed.

REMINDER – entries over the 250 limit are disqualified.

Which "Curves" Flash Fiction Story Gets Your Vote?

  • Steve Stucko (20%, 4 Votes)
  • Rutger Galtiarii (15%, 3 Votes)
  • Katharine Houston-Voss (15%, 3 Votes)
  • Ann Zimmerman (15%, 3 Votes)
  • Mary Kay Bonfante (15%, 3 Votes)
  • Marjorie McCoy (5%, 1 Votes)
  • Theodore Jerome Cohen (5%, 1 Votes)
  • Ken Talley (5%, 1 Votes)
  • Leigh Kimmel (5%, 1 Votes)

Total Voters: 20

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NOTE: Entrants whose submissions exceed the 250 word limit will be disqualified even if they win. ONE VOTE PER PERSON, please. Duplicate votes will be deleted. The results displayed above are unofficial until verified by administration.

When Your PR Guy Clucks

weirdo the rooster sells booksMost writers think gimmicks are stupid. Well, I’m here to dispel that rumor. Gimmicks, if used effectively and “discreetly,” can benefit book sales greatly. Sometimes it’s not WHAT your gimmick is, but WHO your gimmick is. Yes, who. And my who has two legs, feathers, and at times, an attitude.

Meet my PR guy: Continue reading “When Your PR Guy Clucks”

Four Tips to Help You Self-Edit

self editing correcting-1870721_1920 courtesy of pixabaySo, you’ve finished your novel, let it sit, made some revisions, and now you’re ready to send it to an editor. Not quite. First you need to do some self editing.

But, you’re not good at editing, you say. Well, too bad. Get good. I’m not joking, and I’m not being flip, either. As an author, whether self-published or traditionally published, you need to be a decent self-editor. Does that mean you need to go back to school to get an English degree? Of course not. But, as a reader, you have an idea of what makes a good story. The point of editing is getting it ready for the world to see. That means you want a manuscript that flows smoothly and is free of errors. The good news is good editing is often as much about taking time and care in evaluating your manuscript than it is about being a grammar fiend. Yes, you want a professional editor in the end, but you doing a bang-up job with it first, helps for many reasons. First, it costs more for an editor to work with a sloppy manuscript than it does to work with a fairly clean one. [A big reason many authors send their manuscripts out to beta readers before editors – but you still need to self-edit first.] Second, a particularly sloppy manuscript that requires a lot of work from the editor will lead to editing fatigue. So many errors make the editor lose his or her freshness and certainly prevents them from looking forward to coming back to it.

So, if you’re not great at editing, but want to punch it up, how do you do it? Continue reading “Four Tips to Help You Self-Edit”

Lizzy Loomis Wins Flash Fiction Challenge

Lizzy Loomis is the Readers’ Choice in this week’s Indies Unlimited Flash Fiction Challenge. The winning entry is decided by the popular vote and rewarded with a special feature here today. (In the case of a tie, the writer who submitted an entry first is the winner per our rules.) Without further ado, here’s the winning story:

Continue reading “Lizzy Loomis Wins Flash Fiction Challenge”