Choices for Publishing, 2017 Edition

publish buttonI admit it. When it comes to where and how I publish my books, I’ve been on autopilot for the past several years – I put all of my eBooks in KDP Select and publish my paperbacks with CreateSpace. So when someone in the IU Fans Facebook group asked what alternatives exist today for indies who don’t want to put their books into KDP Select, I figured it was time to do a little digging.

It turns out that not much has changed in the three years since we last looked at publishing choices. Indies still basically have four options for eBook publishing: Amazon’s KDP, Apple’s iBooks, Nook Press, and Kobo.

Earlier this year, Author Earnings released a report showing Amazon is far and away the leader, with more than 80 percent of English-language eBook sales worldwide – both indie and traditionally-published – and 91 Continue reading “Choices for Publishing, 2017 Edition”

Service Publishers — a la Carte for Authors

service industry for authors chafing-dish-910535_960_720The publishing industry has changed dramatically over the last forty years. I’ve seen it. My first two books were published by a traditional publisher, a New York house, in the 1980s. That was probably the last time any large publisher took a chance on an unknown. After that, they got much more conservative, much more risk-averse, and pretty much only went with a name that they knew could command sales. Many small presses sprang up into the breach of the 1990s, and then the big explosion — self-publishing — came along after the turn of the century. Now, just about anything goes, and there is a wide range of publishing options for the hopeful author.

What’s it all mean? Let’s break it down. Continue reading “Service Publishers — a la Carte for Authors”

Secrets I Learned from Running a Book Promotion Site

book promotion secrets courtesy pixabay girl-1076998_960_720I’m sixty days into my new position as top dog at an eBook promotion site. It’s been a ton of fun and along the way I’ve had several mini-epiphanies. I want to share them with you because I think as writers and marketers, the things I’ve learned might help you. And, if you’re like me, you might find some of this truly surprising.

1.       Readers are really, really grateful that the service is there.

I thought the whole world knew about Bookbub and ENT and whatever other book promotion site is currently flavor of the month. This is incorrect. Either they know about those other services and they want more choices, or they haven’t heard of them. I’ve received multiple emails thanking me for the service. Right after the “thank you”, the one sentence I hear over and over is “I love your books”. Continue reading “Secrets I Learned from Running a Book Promotion Site”

But You Promised to Review My Book

sad author baby-cougar-1065101_960_720At first glance, my assignment seems straightforward. Write a post about what authors can do to not get taken advantage of by reviewers who ask for a print version of your book and then don’t come through with the promised review. The short answer is probably “not much.” But Ms. Brooks says one paragraph of seventy words won’t cut it as a “real post.” So, I’ll ramble on.

The reality is that once this has happened, there isn’t a whole lot you can do. It doesn’t matter whether the “reviewer” is a scam artist looking for inventory to sell at his or her local used bookstore, or a well-meaning reviewer who didn’t follow through. Continue reading “But You Promised to Review My Book”