Sunday Book Showcase: Exodus 2022

Exodus 2022 by Kenneth G. BennettExodus 2022
by Kenneth G. Bennett
Genres: suspense, post-apocalyptic science fiction
422 pages
4.3 stars on 128 reviews

Joe Stanton is in agony: out of his mind over the death of his young daughter.

Unable to contain his grief, Joe loses control in public, screaming his daughter’s name and causing a huge scene at a hotel on San Juan Island in Washington State. Thing is, Joe Stanton doesn’t have a daughter. Never did. And when the authorities arrive they blame the 28-year-old’s outburst on drugs.

What they don’t yet know is that others up and down the Pacific coast — from the Bering Sea to the Puget Sound — are suffering identical, always fatal mental breakdowns.

With the help of his girlfriend, Joe struggles to unravel the meaning of the hallucination destroying his mind. The couple begins to perceive its significance — and Joe’s role in a looming global calamity.

Exodus 2022 is available from and Amazon UK

Exclusive excerpt from Exodus 2022 by Kenneth G. Bennett

Continue reading “Sunday Book Showcase: Exodus 2022”

Book Brief: Dying for a Living

Dying for a Living by Kory M. ShrumDying for a Living
by Kory M. Shrum
Genres: Urban/Contemporary Fantasy
Word Count: 80,000

On the morning before her sixty-seventh death, it is business as usual for Jesse Sullivan: meet with the mortician, counsel soon-to-be-dead clients, and have coffee while reading the latest regeneration theory. Jesse dies for a living, literally. As a Necronite, she is one of the population’s rare two percent who can serve as a death replacement agent, dying so others don’t have to. Although each death is different, the result is the same: a life is saved, and Jesse resurrects days later with sore muscles, new scars, and another hole in her memory.

But when Jesse is murdered and becomes the sole suspect in a federal investigation, more than her freedom and sanity are at stake. She must catch the killer herself — or die trying.

Dying for a Living is available from Amazon.comAmazon UK, and most major online retailers.

Kory, how did you come up with the title for your book? Does it have any special meaning?
The protagonist Jesse Sullivan dies for a living, literally. So Dying for a Living fits–and has a nice ring to it, don’t you think? Continue reading “Book Brief: Dying for a Living”

Book Brief: Upgrade

by Stephen Hise
Genre: Contemporary fiction/psychological drama
62,886 words

A very wealthy but unattractive young man undergoes a microprocedure that re-contours his face. Though he sees the same reflection in the mirror as always, others now see him as extremely attractive. Whole new worlds of romantic possibilities open up to him, but there is a terrible and unforeseen price.

This title is available from Amazon US, Amazon UK, Smashwords, and other online retailers. Continue reading “Book Brief: Upgrade”

Book Brief: The Alhambra Decree

The Alhambra DecreeThe Alhambra Decree
by Lilian Gafni
Genres: historical fiction
Word Count: 120,000

The year is 1491, and sixteen-year-old Isabella Obrigon is kidnapped from her privileged life. When told she isn’t of Spanish noble blood, but rather the child of a Jewish woman who died in childbirth, Isabella becomes personally embroiled in the terror of the Inquisition. She finds herself imprisoned in the famed fortress of Alhambra, where an encounter with mysterious Miguel Costa impels her to accept having been adopted and to vow to find her birth parents.

The Spanish monarchs fight to unify Spain as a Catholic nation; as soon as the war is over, the Queen Isabella must fulfill her vow to the grand inquisitor to rid Spain of all heretics. She decrees the Jews’ exile.

Isabella Obrigon must decide whether to follow her heart and join her endangered brethren seeking exile, or stay and live a lie.

The Alhambra Decree: Flower from Castile Trilogy Book One is available from Amazon.comAmazon UK, and all major online retailers.

Lilian, how did you come up with the title for your book? Does it have any special meaning?
I wanted to show that a thing of beauty could also be detrimental. For example, Isabella’s mother called her my flower. When Spain expelled its Jews from Castile they lost their finest ‘flowers’ consisting of artisans, workers, traders, carpenters, farmers, smiths, jewelers, etc., and consequently draining their economy for the following centuries. Continue reading “Book Brief: The Alhambra Decree”