Selling Books in Odd Places… Farmers Markets

farmers market books and eggsAdmittedly, I’ve sold books at some odd places: a military retirement, a winery (oh, that was a blast!), a flea market, work (to the surprise of friends who never knew I was an author), and the oddest yet: a farmers market.

Yup, you read that right, a farmers market. Because in my “real” job, I’m a farmer. After 20 years in the military, it was time for a change, so we ended up in the Middle of Nowhere, Kentucky on 100 acres. We have the standard farm animals: chickens, ducks, turkeys, horses, goats, a pig, and a pack of dogs. And there are times of the year our 70 laying hens are going gang-busters producing eggs. More eggs than we can handle. So what do you do with all of them? We try to sell as much as possible to local customers who stop by, but that’s not many. And there are only so many eggs you can donate to the local summer camp. So a friend invited me to come to her county to the farmers market. Continue reading “Selling Books in Odd Places… Farmers Markets”

From the Mail Room: What Do I Do with My Book?

mail-room-author-emails-office-899351_960_720A reader sent in this question:

I have a couple questions on how to start my book. I don’t know if it’s long enough or good enough for it to be published. I need a little insight from someone with experience. I sent my manuscript to page publishing but my grandma thought it was a scam because she said when you normally start off writing as a beginner they give you money to help start is that true? I need help!

First of all, we love your grandmother. She’s not exactly on course, but our own Fearless Leader always says: “When it comes to publishing, if you have to pay, run away.” As for the advice you seek, here’s the answer from our K. Rowe: Continue reading “From the Mail Room: What Do I Do with My Book?”

The Hard Facts on Hardcover Books

hard cover books book-wall-1151410_960_720Article by
K. Rowe and K. S. Brooks

Hardcover books are seen as a luxury to novel-writers, but to children’s book and picture book authors, they’re seen as a necessity. Until recently, publishing a hardcover was out of reach of indie authors.

Today, we’re going to focus on six manufacturers — some well-known in Indie book circles, some not so well-known. Some of these suppliers offer print-on-demand (POD) services, some don’t. Of course, using a POD printer means you won’t find yourself saddled with dozens (or more) of copies of a book you can’t sell. Who wants to drive around with a trunk full of books?

Sizes, page counts, and minimum quantities vary by supplier. In order to keep things as standard as possible, we asked these publishers to quote the following: Continue reading “The Hard Facts on Hardcover Books”

When Words No Longer Pay; An Author’s Alternative Income

broke writer trouser-pockets-1439412_960_720As the industry fluctuates, there will be times when your books aren’t earning what they used to. So what do you do? If you’re like me, you appreciate some income each month. But here’s the kicker: you need to have some skills.

Skills, you ask? Yes, skills. If you’re vaguely computer savvy (like me) you can turn what you love into another business. Did you format your own manuscript for publication? For print and eBook? Did you get pretty good at CreateSpace’s print book cover creator? If you answered yes to more than one of those questions, there’s hope for you. Continue reading “When Words No Longer Pay; An Author’s Alternative Income”