Release Day Mania

Bulletproof - Share the PostEven with the introduction of pre-order publishing across the board, I still think a book’s release day is a really big deal. A song and dance needs to be made on the day your book goes live. You really want as many people to buy your book on the day of release as possible. Your rankings have a better chance of soaring in that first week than at any other time. I mean, yes, you can do a sale later on in the book’s life and pay for advertising – that’s actually a really smart move, but release day rankings are a sweet spot that should be taken advantage of.

So – how do we get the world buying, or noticing, your book on its release day? While there are many different techniques out there, here are a few I’ve used: Continue reading

Publicists: A View from the Other Side

hunger-413685_640 pixabayMelissa Pearl’s post about her experiences working with a publicist got me thinking about the publicist experience from my end. I’m contacted by publicists on behalf of authors quite often. Those interactions can be both good and not so good, both in what I experience and, at least from my limited perspective, how well the publicist accomplishes the author’s goal in hiring them.

I’ll start with the proviso that a publicist might not be a publicist. Depending on what kind of publicity you want, there are other terms that might apply. I’ve been approached by publicists for the obvious things such as writing a story about or interviewing the author, to the less obvious like an offer of a guest post or soliciting reviews, sometimes as part of a blog tour. A blog tour operator is an example of a publicist with a very specific focus. The same could be said of someone at a small press who wears multiple hats, including that of publicist. Some authors hire personal assistants who, as part or all of their duties, function as publicists and marketers. Keep this in mind, not only in considering my post, but in evaluating whether a publicist makes sense for you and, if so, how. Continue reading

Featured Book: Tea Cups & Tiger Claws

Tea Cups And Tiger ClawsTea Cups and Tiger Claws
by Timothy Patrick
Genres: literature, women’s fiction, suspense
Available from Amazon

In 1916, the birth of identical triplets excites a small town. Soon the sisters are split up — two are sent to live in a mansion, and the third is abandoned in a work camp. Over the next 50 years, their lives will intersect in surprising ways. A fascinating novel about love, ambition, and the dark impulses of human nature.

Book Excerpt:

“And what do we have here?” came the low, sinister voice that sounded like bubbling sludge. Sarah struggled to her feet and saw Dorthea at the top of the canyon. Her gown sparkled in the firelight. “Of course it had to be you,” said Dorthea, “because you’re the little nothing who knows how to hang on. Your name isn’t worth a line in the phone book, so you hang on to a better one. Your house isn’t fit for a dog, so you hang on to Sunny Slope Manor.” Dorthea pointed a gun at Sarah. “Fleas and ticks know how to hang on, but they still don’t belong. And neither do you.” She aimed and fired. Sarah saw the bright flash, heard the loud crack, and heard frightened screams coming from up at the house, but didn’t feel any pain; nothing at all. The shot had missed. Dorthea pulled back the hammer and aimed again…

What others are saying:

“This is a smart and savvy novel that will draw readers in from its first page. I highly recommend it.” – Kacunnin, Vine Voice, Top 500 Reviewer

The Anatomy of a Box Set

PWC Omnibus 2 FINAL smallOnce you’ve written a series, one of the things you can do is promote the books as a set. You can do this in one of two ways: 1. by lowering the prices on each book individually; or 2. by putting some, or all, of them together in a single file and calling it an omnibus or a box set.

I would have had to charge upwards of $20 per copy for the Pipe Woman Chronicles Omnibus if I’d gone the dead-tree route. But as an eBook, it’s doable, and not much more difficult to format than an individual book. Basically, you open a new document; create (or copy, paste, and edit) your front matter; copy-and-paste the text of each book in the series into your new document, using a “next page section break” at the end of each book; create (or copy, paste, and edit) your back matter; and save the file. Poof, done. Continue reading