Why I Went from HarperCollins to Indie Publishing

Becky WicksSigning with a mainstream was my breakthrough, but it was also my downfall. I was signed to a three book deal with HarperCollins. A dream-come-true you might be thinking? Well, kind of.

I was young and naïve, with no clue about book marketing at all. I thought HarperCollins would make me a superstar. Not much happened. I waited some more. The international rights were sold but still, not much happened. Because no one did any marketing. Continue reading

August Barnes & Noble Nook Fest

Barnes & Noble LogoWith all the to-do about Kindle Unlimited, everyone seems to have forgotten about Barnes & Noble. I bet they feel really left out. How about we make up for that right now by having a Barnes & Noble book page fest?

This is how it works: If you are an author with a book listed on Barnes&Noble.com, in the comments below, write a SHORT one sentence blurb about ONE of your books, then paste in your link to that book below it. (If you post more than one book, to be fair to everyone else, we will delete all except for the top link, so please behave and post only ONE book link! And please do NOT paste your author page.) Make sure you show some love to the links in the comments above yours, and check back throughout the day to catch up.  If you’re a publisher, editor, librarian, or reader, please check out these book pages – you may see something you like!

Just so there is NO question about what should be clicked or shared where, check out this screen capture:
Mr Pish Goes to the Farm on Barnes & Noble

[Don't forget, if you right-click the links, you can choose to have them open in a separate tab so you don't have to worry about navigating back and forth to pages.]

This should be fun and should generate a lot of likes for everyone’s books. Let’s get things moving – and here’s a book to get you started: http://tinyurl.com/UPGRADEtheNovel

To those with concerns about the ethical implications of “liking” a book you have not read, we regard  likes as more analogous to a “high five” than a rating or review. We do not support the idea of rating or reviewing a book you have never read.

PLEASE be sure to reciprocate by liking the other pages. This is give and take. If everyone plays by the golden rule, we all benefit.

IU is a safe-for-work site. PLEASE do not post links to erotica, religious, or political books.

What Is Price-Pulsing?

price pulsing graphSo you’ve published your book, it’s on every internet book store known to man, you’ve set an affordable price and shouted the word out from the rooftops and now you’re waiting for the money to roll in. But … it doesn’t. What’s up with that?

By now, most of you may have heard of price-pulsing, mentioned here by David Gaughran and on his own blog, as well as other blogs across the internet. It’s a pricing strategy whose time has come, and many of us are using it to advantage. Continue reading

Are You Sure the Description of Your Book at Amazon Is Your Latest One?

Guest post
by Sylvia Engdahl

Did you know that people who view your Kindle book during your promotion may not be seeing its current description? If your book has been available for some time and you have revised its description in Author Central without also revising it on its KDP page, they’re not.

Although we were told in the past that the KDP description is not used if a description has ever been entered in Author Central — and some books about Kindle promotion still say this — Amazon has changed its system. The KDP description now overrides whatever was done in Author Central if any change at all is made through KDP, including price or categories. Continue reading

Cross Training: It’s For Writers, Too

iStock_000001468685XSmallBefore a series of accidents and injuries took me out of the game for good, I was a competitive runner. Not a very good one, because my choice of parents gave me tiny little legs and a lack of speed, but I enjoyed lacing up my sneaks and getting out on the road—the discipline, the feeling of accomplishment, the community. Then, somewhere around the death of disco, those experts in the running community began sounding a drumbeat about cross training. If all you did was run, they said, it increased your chances of getting bored, getting burned out, and yes, getting injured. So, along with running, I played racquetball. I race-walked. I took up yoga. I swam. I lifted weights. Not only did this stave off my eventual need to quit the sport, it helped me segue into different activities that kept me fit and generally sane without the need to sign half my income over to physical therapists and chiropractors. Continue reading